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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> rose: welcome to the program. we begin this evening talking about mitt romney's foreign policy speech at b.m.i. earlier today. joining me, tom friedman. >> and i don't think this is the time when americans are looking after two exhausting and incredibly costly wars in the middle east to be making big foreign policy initiatives. now, that said, we do have v the arab spring and things happen on your watch, you've got to respond to them. and for my money what i would like to do is see us really start to rethink our whole way of relating to that part of the world and i would -- if i had my druthers-- i say this half seriously, half tongue in cheek-- i'd like to see arne duncan, secretary of education, be put in charge of middle east policy. because i tnk what really neeto be moving toward this there is a kind of race formula. >> rose: we continue looking at foreign policy issues in the campaign with david sanger of "new york times" and richard haass in the council on foreign relations. >> he basically laid out a conditional foreign policy. saying "look, the era where we give aid t
: with that mitt romney took aim at foreign policy today in a speech at virginia military institute in lexington, virginia. >> wh we look wi iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region and with violent extremists on the march and with an american ambassador and three others dead likely at the hands of al qaeda affiliates it's clear that the risk of conflict in the region is higher now than when the president took office. >> woodruff: that last point involved the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya and the death of ambassador chris stevens on the nit of september 11. the admistrioninitlly blamed an anti-muslim film for inciting the trouble. more recently officials have said new information indicates it was a terrorist attack. today romney again criticized the president's response in libya. >> i want to be very clear. the blame for the murder of our people in libya and the attacks on our embassies in so many other countries lie solely with those who carry them out. no one else. but it is our responsibility and the
years. i think he is better at that and i think that kind of sophistication about foreign policy, that sort of experience in the world and also a sensibility that the other parts of the world different than ours are not bad. romney takes this american exceptionism too far in saying we are the good guys, our country right or wrong, these foreigners, europe is sort of bad, it is sort of, you know, it is sort of rotten, at least. and the rest of the world is dangerous and the arabs and all, there is a sense of the other is evil, it is not evil dangerous and i think the president is a much more positive view about the world, and perhaps less truculent and less mill tar risk so i think that is a big decision .. do we want to continue to join the world or do we want t stand-alone and use american exceptionism as our sort of justification for more military action? i think it is a real difference. it is within the 40-yard line on both sides but there is a difference, center right, center left and i think it is a good judgment for the american people to think which direction should we be
or the series of debates all three debates prompted them to take a second look. >> woodruff: in foreign policy in the last few days we're hearing a lot more from the rom camp about mistakes they say the president made when it came to the attack in libya. mitt romney has an op-ed in the wall street journal. is this likely to make a difference? this first debate is supposed to be about domestic issues. >> the white house is open to criticism that they mischaracterized the nature of the benghazi attack initially, tried to downplay it, said it wasn't terrorism but a mob action. i don't think this is the kind of issue that moves voters at a time when unemployment is 8.1% when the foreclosures are still a huge problem. it's an opening but not a game-changing kind of opening. >> i agree but if you're the romney campaign you look for any opportunity to put th president on the defensive and raise questions about him as a leader. that's what i think they're tryinged to do. >> woodruff: all right. well, we are delighted to have both of you back with us this monday night. stu rothenberg, susan page, thank
were economy-- >> i know, but the forum was so easy you could bring it up. they brought up foreign policy and osama bin laden and he brought up the middle east. there was no mention of same-sex marriage. no mention of the environment. >> no mention of mitt romney's tax returns, which has been-- >> he gave obama an opening. he said maybe i have the wrong accountant. >> that was a great opening. >> that was a wide open. >> that's what i meant about the rest. >> woodruff: you think the fact the president hasn't debated since 2008. >> perhaps, john kerry is a skilled debater, but john kerry also wants to be secretary of state. i wonder how tough he went in those sections because that was the charge against david stockman after ronald reagan in '84. that's why reagan, he was too tough on him. >> ifill: can we talk about body language? one of the thinks we remember is the way al exwoar crowded george w. bush and gave him the look or the way someone sighed, the way the two relate standing next to each other. did you get anything watching that? >> i'm not sure there will be a moment easy t
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)